September 5, 2014
Negrismo/Negritud/Négritude: Inter-American Dialogues

Negrismo, unlike negritud, generated a dilettante image because of its close similarity to European negrophilia or the scholarly and artistic interest shown in the black by Leo Frobenius … and others. 

Negritud, on the other hand, incorporated, as René Dépestre notes, ”a conscious and deliberate preoccupation with the destruction of the myths and stereotypes” of Blacks in the Americas. In this stage of the Afrocriollo movement, Black Latin American writers explored Black life and significant social and cultural issues, thus marking a period where ”the black Hispanic for the first time came center stage as author, subject, cultural hero, and as an essential component of new world culture”

While Hughes validates African heritage in a then segregated culture, according to Rodriíguez-Mourelo, Guillén must reclaim an Afro-Hispanic identity from an imposed heterogeneity.

via

September 1, 2014
Ostend Manifesto on the Purchase of Cuba

(Pierre SouleJames Mason and James Buchanan — U.S. ambassadors to France, Spain and Great Britain and all pro-slavery Democrats) held a meeting in Ostend, Belgium, on October 9, 10 and 11, 1854, where they drew up a manifesto that did little but claim the U.S. right to Cuba (by force if Spain refused to sell) and U.S. Southern cotton growers and sugar planters embraced it passionately, seeing in it a chance to extend slavery if Cuba became an American possession. 

unreal discovery about US interests in Cuba taking place in the 1850s in Ostend, Belgium, where part of my family now lives…crazy connections

September 1, 2014
Planters’ Fear of Unity: Trans-Racial Cooperation in Haitian/Cuban rebellions

1795 - Nicolás Morales, a free Negro, leads an uprising that starts in Bayamo and quickly spreads throughout the eastern part of Cuba before it is suppressed by the Spanish army.Philip Foner in A History of Cuba and its Relations with the United States, Vol. 1, 1492-1845: “…what especially disturbed the slave-owners about this uprising was that whites and Negroes joined together in the revolt and demanded, as in the Haitian Revolution, equality between black and white.”

L’Union fait la force 

September 1, 2014
UGH, so the modern Cuban flag is based on a design by this asshole Narciso López who wasn’t Cuban, fought with the Spanish against Bolivar, approved of slavery, and finally joined forces with US Southerners to orchestrate filibustering actions against Cuba, which they hoped would provoke the US into annexing it as another southern slave state…GROSS
some of these sun flags might have been a much better choice 

UGH, so the modern Cuban flag is based on a design by this asshole Narciso López who wasn’t Cuban, fought with the Spanish against Bolivar, approved of slavery, and finally joined forces with US Southerners to orchestrate filibustering actions against Cuba, which they hoped would provoke the US into annexing it as another southern slave state…GROSS

some of these sun flags might have been a much better choice 

September 1, 2014
Operation Northwoods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

concrete examples of US intentions to provoke war with Cuba by:

1. making Cuba appear to have attacked another OAS member country (Grenada?…)

2. bribing Cuban officials to attack the US (Kennedy assassination?…)

this shit never stopped

August 20, 2014
Postcolonial Paradoxes in French Caribbean Writing

"Gayatri Spivak reminds us that ‘the general mode for the post-colonial is citation, re-inscription, re-routing the historical’."

"A group resorts to Détour when it finds itself in a situation of oppression and misery in which there is no clear enemy nor a tangible system of domination against which a people would otherwise organize, mobilize, and struggle collectively. “

"Glissant’s primary example of Détour in the Antilles is the Creole language, which began and is marked still by a strategy of trickery […] Creole speakers used French in a deriding and deforming way, to wreak violence on the language itself.”

"Rather this Détour leads to a new consciousness of alienation, of identity as alienation, a discovery of home as a place of exile.”

"This new consciousness does not result then in a happy arrival, but in another departure, in the face of another alienation, another exile. It is this constant and repeating process of departures between places, without real arrivals, that makes up the logic of Détour.”

"If history can be seen as indirectly referential, then it is through the Détour of other groups’ histories that one can refer to one’s own history. Glissant articulates the need for the history of Martinique and Guadeloupe to discover its connections to the histories of other islands in the Caribbean, with whom links might currently be tenuous or non-existent:”

'Today we hear the blast from Matouba, but also the volley of shots fired at Moncada. Our history comes to life with a stunning unexpectedness. The emergence of this common experience broken in time (of this concealed parallel in histories) that shapes the Caribbean at this time surprises us before we have even thought about this parallel.'

"The delayed blast of Matouba is interpreted as referring to and as referred to by another blast separated in time and space. While Matouba’s blast ended a failed revolution, Moncada was the failed first attack of an ultimately successful revolution. Indeed, Moncada itself is an example of latency and return: although Castro’s attack was violently suppressed and Castro was tried for organizing it, the effect of Moncada was ultimately to play an important symbolic role in the Cuban consciousness and revolutionary struggle."

"By drawing on the meaning of the history of another island, Glissant implies that latency may also prove effective in the Antillean context. Out of the discontinuity between two histories, two islands, comes a relationship of mutual reference and merging."

'The implosion of Caribbean history (of the converging histories of our peoples) relieves us of the linear, hierarchical vision of a single History that would run its unique course. It is not this History that has roared around the edge of the Caribbean, but actually a question of the subterranean convergence of our histories. The depths are not only the abyss of neurosis but primarily the site of multiple converging paths.'

August 18, 2014
Eduardo Galeano | Mirrors

Red Emperor

I was in China three years after the failure of the Great Leap Forward. No one talked about it. It was a state secret.

I saw Mao paying homage to Mao. In Tiananmen Square, the Gate of Heavenly Peace, Mao presided over an immense parade led by an immense statue of Mao. The plaster Mao held his hand high, and the flesh-and-blood Mao answered the greeting. From an ocean of flowers and colored balloons, the crowd cheered both.

Mao was China and China was his shrine. Mao exhorted all to follow the example set by Lei Feng and Lei Feng exhorted all to follow the example set by Mao. Lei Feng, a young Communist apostle of dubious existence, spent his days consoling the sick, helping widows, and giving his food away to orphans. His nights he spent reading the complete works of Mao. When he slept, he dreamed of Mao, his guide for every step. Lei Feng had no girlfriend or boyfriend because he did not waste time on frivolities, and it never occurred to him that life could be contradictory or reality diverse.

Fidel

His enemies say he was an uncrowned king who confused unity with unanimity.

And in that his enemies are right.

His enemies say that if Napoleon had a newspaper like Granma, no Frenchman would have learned of the disaster at Waterloo.

And in that his enemies are right.

His enemies say that he exercised power by talking a lot and listening little, because he was more used to hearing echoes than voices.

And in that his enemies are right.

But some things his enemies do not say: it was not to pose for the history books that he bared his breast to the invaders’ bullets,

he faced hurricanes as an equal, hurricane to hurricane,

he survived 637 attempts on his life,

his contagious energy was decisive in making a country out of a colony,

and it was not by Lucifer’s curse or God’s miracle that the new country managed to outlive 10 U.S. presidents, their napkins spread in their laps, ready to eat it with knife and fork.

And his enemies never mention that Cuba is one rare country that does not compete for the World Doormat Cup.

And they do not say that the revolution, punished for the crime of dignity, is what it managed to be and not what it wished to become. Nor do they say that the wall separating desire from reality grew ever higher and wider thanks to the imperial blockade, which suffocated a Cuban-style democracy, militarized society, and gave the bureaucracy, always ready with a problem for every solution, the alibis it needed to justify and perpetuate itself.

And they do not say that in spite of all the sorrow, in spite of the external aggression and the internal high-handedness, this distressed and obstinate island has spawned the least unjust society in Latin America.

And his enemies do not say that this feat was the outcome of the sacrifice of its people, and also of the stubborn will and old-fashioned sense of honor of the knight who always fought on the side of the losers, like his famous colleague in the fields of Castile.

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August 15, 2014

The Bacardís: supporters of the pre-revolutionary, mafia-run, Bacchanalian Cuba, Capitalists, and right-wing terrorista promoters.

PLUS, their rum tastes awful.

Cuba: Una revolución incompatible con Bacardí

El odio los cría y la FNCA los junta

August 3, 2014
[Ext. Cuba, Italian Mobsters from the US:]
Q. How do you say banana daiquiri?
A. …Banana daiquiri.

[Ext. Cuba, Italian Mobsters from the US:]

Q. How do you say banana daiquiri?

A. …Banana daiquiri.

August 3, 2014
fucking US Marine pissing on a statue of José Martí in Cuba

fucking US Marine pissing on a statue of José Martí in Cuba

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